Video briefing explains £24m emission-reduction competition

Anyone interested in entering a £24m competition aimed at developing vehicle technology to reduce real-world tail-pipe emissions can now view a video explaining more.

The competition has been jointly launched by the Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV), the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy, and Innovate UK.

In particular, the government hopes to fund projects that will develop low-cost, integrated systems enabling zero-emission journeys.

Projects must be collaborative, with a business lead to each consortium. They are split into three streams (see below).

Interested parties looking to find project partners are encouraged to get in touch with the Knowledge Transfer Network.

The registration deadline is noon on 19 October, with applications deadline set for noon on 26 October.

The streams

Steam one will find collaborative technical feasibility studies. These should be for disruptive technology that can achieve significant emissions savings from road vehicles.

Projects in this stream are expected to range in size from £200,000 to £500,000 and should last no more than one year.

Stream two will fund collaborative research and development projects. These should focus on attaining a proof of concept for technology that can achieve significant emissions reductions from road vehicles.

OLEV said it is particularly keen to support technologies that provide zero tailpipe emission miles, which should provide a technical and commercial proof of concept.

Projects in this second stream are expected to range in size from £2m to £4m and last between 18 months and three years.

Stream three will fund collaborative research and development projects that can produce results within one year. These should focus on generating significant emissions savings from road vehicles.

In this stream, projects must be ready for a fast delivery within a fixed one-year timeframe and must show rapid progression towards commercial success. Stream three projects are expected to cost £500,000 to £1.5m.