Daimler launches all-electric Fuso eCanter truck in New York

Daimler has globally launched its all-electric truck in New York City, marking the vehicle’s entrance to the US, European and Japanese markets.

The Fuso eCanter has a range of 100kms and payload of around three tonnes.

Daimler hopes to deliver 500 eCanter units in the next two years, with a view to ramping up production in 2019.

Production of the trucks began in Tramagal, Portugal earlier this year, after trials of pre-series vehicles in the country and Germany between 2014 and 2017.

The truck made its UK debut at the Freight in the City Expo last year.

Speaking at the launch, Mitsubishi truck and bus corporation president Marc Llistosella, said: “In times, when everybody is talking about electric trucks, we are the first to actually commercialize a series produced all-electric truck.

“Having a long history in alternative drivetrains, we are proud to step into this new era. Our Fuso eCanter comes with years of customer testing, and the assurance of parts, services, and warranty through our global Fuso dealership network.”

He added: “Our new Fuso eCanter now addresses the increasing global demand for products to meet and exceed high CO2 emission standards. It offers an attractive and cost-effective alternative to combustion engines and makes electric trucks key to the future of inner city distribution.”

At the global launch in New York, Daimler announced UPS would be the first commercial partner for the electric truck.

UPS president of global fleet maintenance and engineering Carlton Rose said: “At UPS, we constantly evaluate and deploy advanced technologies that enable sustainable, innovative solutions for our fleet.

“Electric trucks make our fleet both cleaner and quieter, adding to our already more than 8,500 alternative drivetrain vehicles in service today.

“We have a long-standing global relationship with Daimler, and we welcome the opportunity to trial the Fuso eCanter as UPS continues to realize the benefits of electric trucks.”

It will also supply vehicles to a range of not-for-profit organisations including the Wildlife Conservation Society and Habitat for Humanity.

  • jayarc

    Good news. But what about the weight of the batteries? How much more does this vehicle weigh than the equivalent truck with an internal combustion engine? And who’s going to pick up the cost of road damage caused by the extra weight?